The costs of moving home

Little girl lying on a rug

Moving home can be an expensive time and if you’re not prepared for it, the cost of moving can really mount up.

It's a good idea to make sure that you factor in all of the costs of moving home right from the start.

Here’s our guide to the main costs of moving home.

Stamp Duty Land Tax

Stamp duty is a tax which is paid by the buyer to the government, and is the biggest single cost of moving home.

Until recently, you would have paid the same rate of Stamp Duty on the entire property transaction in the UK. So if you purchased a home at £250,000, you paid 1% on the whole transaction. If you purchased a home at £251,000; just £1 over the threshold, you paid 3% on the whole transaction.

Now, the amount of Stamp Duty you will pay in England increases on a sliding scale rather than in big jumps - like income tax.

The Scottish Government is also planning to introduce a new way to tax the purchase of homes in Scotland from April 2015. Find out more about Scotland's Land and Buildings Transaction Tax.

Under the new rules, you’ll pay new Stamp Duty Land Tax or Land and Buildings Transaction Tax rates on the part of the property price within each tax band. In England, that means you'll pay:

  • nothing on the first £125,000 of the property price
  • 2% on the next £125,000
  • 5% on the next £675,000
  • 10% on the next £575,000
  • 12% on the rest (above £1.5 million)

For example, if you buy a property for £275,000, you’ll pay £3,750 of SDLT, as follows:

  • £0 on the first £125,000
  • £2,500 on the next £125,000
  • £1,250 on the remaining £25,000
  • Total = £3,750

Under the old rules, you would have paid 3% on the total purchase price - costing you £8,250. Find out more about Stamp Duty Land Tax or Land and Buildings Transaction Tax.

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Solicitors are used to approve all the paperwork and to make sure that the sale is legally made. Whilst you do not have to employ a solicitor, doing your own conveyancing may cause problems as it is a complicated process.

If you're a first time buyer, you will have enough to think about without needing to worry about the intricate legalities of buying your new home.

You should always obtain a quote before any work is carried out. Solicitors can either charge a fixed fee a percentage of the selling price, or they may charge by the hour. Costs like Land Registry and Local Authority Search Fees will also be added to the quote.

We suggest using a solicitor that has been recommended to you to be sure that you’ll get a good service. If you buy a new home from Taylor Wimpey, you could use one of our tried and trusted panel solicitors.

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Your mortgage lender will nearly always require you to have a survey carried out. The type of survey you have done will vary in cost according to how thorough they are.

  • A Valuation Survey is a basic, surface survey and usually costs around £150
  • A Homebuyer's Report is advisable and costs between £250 and £500.
  • A Structural Survey is recommended for absolute peace of mind but can cost anything up to £1,000 plus VAT.

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If you’re a first time buyer, you may not have much furniture to move! But if you do need help, ask for quotes from at least 3 different removal firms, as prices vary.

If you decide to do the removal yourself, it will still cost you to hire a van, and you’ll need to pay for petrol and insurance.

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One off costs

There are bound to be some additional one off costs associated with buying a new home. Will you need new carpets or furniture? Or will you need to put your pets into accommodation whilst you move?

Make sure you think carefully about all the potential costs that you might incur whilst moving house so that you are well prepared for them. It’s a good idea to have a contingency fund available if you can.

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Living in your home

Also make sure you remember to factor in the cost of living in your new home. Energy bills, council tax and insurance costs all add up to a sizable chunk of your monthly outgoings.

Make sure you have factored in everything, including money for any non-essential expenses such as holidays to ensure that you will be able to meet your mortgage repayments every month.

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